5 Incredible Ways Dogs Have Been Valued and Even Worshiped

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5 Incredible Ways Dogs Have Been Valued and Even Worshiped

Pet gurus are always claiming that dogs have a deep sense of loyalty to humans because they have an extensive shared history. In fact, researchers tell us that both dogs and humans have actually evolved together. And this connection between them goes back thousands of years.

Researchers once believed that dogs actually evolved from wolves in the wild and starting cohabiting with ancient humans. But recent studies have reach totally different conclusion altogether. Experts now think they were spun off from wolves around 135,000 years ago, which was prior to dogs dwelling with humans.

The great news is that humans have shown lots of ways to pay respects and gratitude to their canine friends. Here 5 incredible ways dogs have been valued and even worshiped in the past.

Territorio de Zaguates

Territorio de Zaguates

Territorio de Zaguates is located in Costa Rica and is considered the land of the stray dogs. This place is actually utopia for dog lovers. This is where dogs of all types and ages are welcomed with opened arms to spend the rest of their lives playing with each other.

This was one a huge ranch that later turned into a massive sanctuary for dogs and has become the world’s largest no-kill shelter. Every single dog gets to roam the beautiful countryside, where they are totally safe from typical canine dangers like cars, dogcatchers, and mean people.

Native Dog Burials 

Native dog burial

Throughout both North America and South America, Native American burial sites have revealed that they thoroughly valued the companionship of dogs. These Native American canines benefited from human protection and were revered as vermin hunters in villages.

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In southern Illinois at the Janey B. Goode site, archaeologists have discovered hundreds of dogs that were buried carefully, and some are even buried in pairs. The utmost care that was used to bury these dogs indicates a love and tenderness that existed between man and pet.

Komainu

Komainu

In Japan, there are several stone dogs that guard the entrances of shrines which are called Komainu. It’s unknown exactly where these mythical creatures came from, but they are an example of the immortalization of dogs during those times.

Many believe that they were originated in India.  And it was within Indian Buddhism that this iconography first appeared in ancient China during the third century.  Later it appeared in the boundaries of Korea where they evolved even further.

Tihar

Tihar

When the Hindus celebrate Diwali each fall, it becomes a colorful festival of lights. People describe it as part Christmas and part Mardi Gras. It is a 5-day festival where people celebrate and exchange gifts and other kindnesses. Tihar is what takes place on the second day of Diwali and it celebrates dogs.

Kukur Tihar is described as a huge birthday party for every single dogs that ever existed—this includes past dogs, present dogs, and future dogs. The objective is smother all dogs with excessive affection. In fact, even strays dogs are treated very lovingly as pets and get to live like canine kings for the day. Celebrators will leave lots of delicious foods on the streets for all dogs to make sure every one of them gets fed.

Wepwawet

Wepwawet

We all know that ancient Egyptians were big cat lovers, but few people are aware that they loved dogs as well. In fact, canines are present through all of the deity displays. Take for instance Anubis, who is the Egyptian God of death and embalming that overlooks the dead while wearing the head of the jackal Wepwawet.

Wepwawet, who was the son of Isis, served to protect the dead while moved throughout the underworld of the afterlife. Many believed that this process started when he opened the dead person’s mouth. This is a common ceremony that allowed the deceased to gift back the treasures and prosperities they enjoyed during their life.

In addition, Wepwawet eventually served as a deity of the local cemetery located at Abydos and also as the lord of the necropolis there.